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Leicester City celebrate winning the Premier League
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Leicester City celebrate winning the Premier League. [Image: Action Images]

All PhysioRoom.com injury stats were collected from between August 1st 2015 and May 20th 2016. Data on injuries sustained before or after these dates has not been included.

Settling the score! PhysioRoom.com presents its top injury facts from the Prem season.

Cast your minds back to Saturday 21st March 2015; the day Tottenham Hotspur ran out to a 4-3 win at home to Leicester City with nine more weeks to play over the remainder of the campaign.

Harry Kane hit a hat-trick for Spurs, while Jamie Vardy got onto the scoresheet for only the fifth occasion and the first time since September 2014.

The result put Mauricio Pochettino's men just three points behind fourth-placed Manchester United. The Foxes, meanwhile, remained rock bottom of the division and seven points from safety.

Back then, it seemed unfathomable that these two teams would be battling it out for the Premier League title the following season, and incomprehensible that it would be Leicester to triumph by a margin of 10 points.

Yet after that defeat to Spurs, a record of one loss in nine was enough to haul them out of the relegation zone and up to a finishing position of 14th. Pearson was sacked at the end of June, the club appointed former Chelsea boss Claudio Ranieri weeks later, and the rest, as they say, is history.

Total number of injuries per club. The top figure only includes injuries which lasted 14 days or more. The bottom figure includes all injury lengths
Total number of injuries per club. The top figure only includes injuries which lasted 14 days or more. The bottom figure includes all injury lengths

Over the course of the season, Leicester lost just three times and chalked up a league-best tally of 23 wins. Their only three defeats came at the hands of Arsenal (twice) and Liverpool, as Ranieri's men took 52 points from 20 fixtures against clubs in the bottom half of the division. This record displayed a professionalism and work-rate from a side unwilling to underestimate their opponents.

The Foxes also held their nerve, spending 146 days at the summit of the division - at no point did they drop below eighth place. On the other hand, Spurs crumbled under pressure. Their worst run of form occurred during their final four games, from which they took just two points. Leicester's status as champions was confirmed when Pochettino's men failed to beat Chelsea and, after losing Dele Alli and Mousa Dembele to retrospective violent conduct bans, Spurs then relinquished second spot to Arsenal after a final-day 5-1 defeat to Newcastle United. Despite finishing with a lower average of days lost per injury than the Gunners - 23.84 compared to 26.44 - they still haven't finished above their north London rivals since 1994/95.

Leicester City had the best injury record this season
Leicester City had the best injury record this season. [Image: Action Images]

The most interesting aspect of Leicester's unlikely title victory is their injury record; their players spent the least amount of time on the treatment table by a long distance, losing just 275 days to injury overall. Ranieri had to deal with just 19 separate injuries in total, and only eight of these kept a player sidelined for 14 days or more. The longest player absence they had was the 75 days required by Jeffrey Schlupp to recover from his hamstring injury; Nathan Dyer's absence with a knee injury was the next longest at 29 days.

Total number of days per club which were lost to injury. Includes all injury lengths.
Total number of days per club which were lost to injury. Includes all injury lengths.

Compare that to their nearest title challengers. Spurs lost 1,073 days to 45 injuries altogether this season; and out of those 45, only 20 injuries took 14 or more days to overcome. Like Leicester, the majority of their problems were shorter, niggling injuries, yet Tottenham's total far eclipses the Foxes'. Over the course of the season, their unluckiest player was Nabil Bentaleb, who was missing for 154 days overall, while they also had to contend with lengthy injuries to Clinton N'Jie (138 days to three injuries) and Jan Vertonghen (78 days to one injury). To their credit, however, Spurs reported the fewest amount of hamstring injuries, which was the most common grievance amongst Premier League clubs - they only suffered three, costing 27 days in total. The area most commonly injured in their squad was the ankle, a problem which was reported 11 times.

This injury data may also go some way to explaining why Man City seemed so far off the pace this year. Manuel Pellegrini's side had to wait until the final day to completely secure fourth place, the first time they have finished outside the top three since 2009/10. They suffered a remarkable 79 separate injuries, the highest total in the Premier League this season, costing them 1,494 days. Samir Nasri spent 232 days on the sidelines for them and became the most expensive injured player of 2015/16 in the process, with City forking out nearly £5m in wages to the Frenchman during his absence. Unlike Spurs, City were hit hard by hamstring injuries, suffering 16 separate problems which translated into 500 days lost.

Approximate overall cost of wages paid to players while they were injured. Only includes players who have been injured for a total of seven days or more.
Approximate overall cost of wages paid to players while they were injured. Only includes players who have been injured for a total of seven days or more.

But we must take into consideration that both Spurs and City were involved in more games than Leicester. The Foxes were knocked out of the Capital One Cup in the fourth round and the FA Cup in the third round, coincidentally to Spurs, meaning they played only 43 games over the course of the season. After beating Leicester in the FA Cup, Spurs went on to exit the competition in the fifth round, while they were beaten at the first stage of the Capital One Cup back in September. However, they also reached the last 16 of the Europa League, so their campaign lasted 53 games in comparison. City, though, were busier than both. They matched Spurs in the FA Cup, won the Capital One Cup and reached the semi-finals of the Champions League, bringing their final total to 59 games. When you consider that Pellegrini's men played approximately 1,440 more minutes of football than Leicester, perhaps it adds up that they would have suffered so many more injuries overall. With Ranieri's side competing in the Champions League too next season, they are unlikely to have kept such an impressive injury record this time next year.

Nevertheless, Leicester's near-flawless campaign this time around meant it was both themselves and Spurs who dominated the end-of-season accolades. 24-goal Vardy was pipped to the golden boot by Kane (25) and the league's two leading goalscorers look set to be part of England's 23-man Euro 2016 squad, with a place on the scoresheet for both during England's 2-1 win over Turkey on Sunday.

Jamie Vardy and Harry Kane are likely to be part of Roy Hodgson's plans this summer
Jamie Vardy and Harry Kane are likely to be part of Roy Hodgson's plans this summer. [Image: Action Images]

Vardy became the club's first recipient of the Football Writers' Association Player of the Year, while Riyad Mahrez was voted the Professional Footballers' Association Player of the Year after hitting 17 goals and setting up a further 11.

Both teams contributed no fewer than four players each into the PFA's Team of the Year. Vardy and Mahrez were joined by Wes Morgan and Danny Drinkwater, and Kane lined up alongside Alli, Toby Alderweireld and Danny Rose.

There was no place for any Chelsea players this time around, following the half-blue PFA selection of last season. Eden Hazard scooped last year's gong with 14 league goals and nine assists, but was a shadow of his former self this time around, the Belgian failing to register a league goal until late April.

Eden Hazard could not match the form which earned him the PFA Player of the Year award last season.
Eden Hazard could not match the form which earned him the PFA Player of the Year award last season. [Image: Action Images]

It was a hugely disappointing campaign all around for Chelsea. After winning the league by eight points last year, they could only limp to a 10th-placed finish in 2015/16, ending up over 30 points behind top spot.

By December, Jose Mourinho had become the league's fifth managerial casualty of the season, preceded by Dick Advocaat, Brendan Rodgers, Tim Sherwood and Garry Monk. After delivering their fourth Premier League title eight months earlier, Mourinho left Stamford Bridge with Chelsea languishing in 16th place, just one point above the drop zone.

It was down to interim boss Guus Hiddink to steer the club to as high a finish as possible, but even he could not prevent Chelsea from officially mounting the worst title defence of the Premier League era. Not even a modest record of under 1,000 days lost to injury - one of only seven clubs to achieve this - could give them an edge over their rivals, although they had to deal with players like Radamel Falcao, whose 158-day absence cost the club nearly £3.5million in wages. The Blues faithful welcome Antonio Conte, currently manager of the Italian national side, to the helm for 2016/17 - and it would certainly be difficult for him to oversee a poorer season than this one.

With Chelsea failing to qualify for Europe for the first time since 1996, the top seven had a different feel to it. Leicester will enter the Champions League group stages for the first time next season, while Spurs secured a return to the competition after a five-year absence.

The three players who have missed the most days due to illness this season.
The three players who have missed the most days due to illness this season.

Finishing fifth meant Man United missed out on joining Europe's elite and they will enter the Europa League again, finishing the campaign with 10 fewer injuries than City but with over 200 more days lost than their neighbours. United's FA Cup victory over Crystal Palace, which was to be Louis van Gaal's last task as manager, also ensured that seventh-placed West Ham scooped the last Europa League spot. The outcome of the final affected sixth-placed Southampton too, who now get a crack at the competition's group stages rather than the qualifiers. Following their Europa League final defeat, Liverpool's final position of eighth place meant they too missed out on European competition. Maybe that's a blessing in disguise for Jurgen Klopp's men, though - their most recent season out of Europe saw them challenge for the title and lose out by just two points in 2013/14.

It will certainly ease their congested fixture list; the Reds played a massive 63 games this season after reaching two cup finals, but have nothing to show for it after being beaten by both Man City and Sevilla in the Capital One Cup and the Europa League respectively. Their lengthy campaign resulted in 68 injuries, totalling 1,862 days lost - 222 of which were from Danny Ings alone, who ruptured his anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) in October before returning ahead of schedule in May. Liverpool also take the unfortunate title of days lost to hamstring problems at 673 for 20 separate injuries - that's over one month spent on each on average. The three biggest hamstring losses were Joe Allen (71 days for two injuries), Martin Skrtel (73 days for one injury) and Rangers-bound Jordan Rossiter (208 days and counting for two injuries).

Liverpool played more games than any other Premier League team this season.
Liverpool played more games than any other Premier League team this season. [Image: Action Images]

Astonishingly, Liverpool's record of days lost to injury is not the worst in the division. That title goes to Newcastle United, relegated from the Premier League for the second time in eight years. The Magpies lost an incredible 2,230 days to 61 injuries, losing over 36.56 days per injury. Two knee problems sustained by Massadio Haidara, who is still sidelined, has lost the club 229 days alone, while Tim Krul, who suffered an ACL injury, isn't far behind him with 223 days lost so far. Unsurprisingly, their most common problem was with hamstrings, which cost them 659 days from 14 separate problems. Such a high amount of problems in a side battling the drop will undoubtedly have an affect. A record of two wins since the turn of the year resulted in the sacking of Steve McClaren in March, and although Newcastle improved under new boss Rafael Benitez, averaging more than one point per game during the 10 matches he took charge of, it wasn't enough and they were already down by the time they ran riot against Spurs on the last day. In comparison, north east rivals Sunderland hauled themselves out of danger under Sam Allardyce after ending 2015 in 19th place and seven points from safety. The Black Cats only lost four league games in 2016, and ended the campaign with an average of just 16.66 days lost per injury overall.

The six Premier League players who missed the most days due to injury this season.
The six Premier League players who missed the most days due to injury this season.

A poor injury record doesn't always spell doom, however. Take Bournemouth, for example; they suffered three ACL injuries this season to Tyrone Mings, Callum Wilson and Max Gradel. That made up 643 days lost to injury of their 1,465 total and ensured they had the worst days-lost-to-injury average of 36.62, as they actually suffered just 40 injuries altogether. However, they finished two places and five points away from the bottom three, a respectable 16th position considering the treatment room troubles they had to contend with. Additionally, Norwich City had one of the best injury records in the division, losing only 723 days to 35 injuries overall, yet a run of 10 league games without a win at the beginning of the year and a general inability to string together a consistent spell of form cost them a place in the top flight next season.

Meanwhile, Aston Villa's season cannot be described as anything other than poor, as they lost the most games, won the fewest and conceded the highest amount of goals to end up rock-bottom of the division and 22 points away from safety. Promising defender Jordan Amavi suffered an ACL rupture during the opening months - the club's longest single injury which cost them over £800,000 in wages - but only half of their 50 total injuries lasted 14 days or more. Whatever the contributory factors, Villa spent 203 days rooted to the foot of the league during 2015/16 - the highest amount of time spent in the same position than any other club.

The amount of injuries reported per month. Based on injuries which lasted 14 days or more.
The amount of injuries reported per month. Based on injuries which lasted 14 days or more.

We already know the identity of two of the Championship sides replacing Villa, Norwich and Newcastle next season. Burnley return as champions after just one season away, and they will be eyeing a similar record to their mere 29 injuries sustained in 2014/15. Middlesbrough took the second promotion spot and will be playing in the top flight for the first time since 2008/09, when they suffered 44 injuries. It's down to Hull City and Sheffield Wednesday to fight it out on Saturday in order to claim the final spot up for grabs; Wednesday's last Premier League stint ended before our records began, but we do know that Hull recorded 54 separate injuries when they went down alongside the Clarets last season.

Elsewhere, Swansea City recorded the lowest days-lost-to-injury average, as 408 days lost from 28 injuries worked out at 14.39 days per injury, slightly better than Leicester's 14.47 average.

Crystal Palace were hit by the unspecified 'knock,' more than any other side, losing 172 days to 17 separate issues - and ironically Newcastle were the least-affected club in that department, with less than two weeks lost to knocks.

And finally, the dreaded ACL injury hit 12 players this season, costing affected clubs 1,874 days in total. That figure will continue to increase, too, as only three players - Gradel, Wilson and Ings - have made a full recovery so far.

Six injury facts from the 2015/16 Premier League season
Six injury facts from the 2015/16 Premier League season.

With thanks to soccerbase.com, statto.com and experimental361.com for their online resources in writing this review. All injury data is sourced from the PhysioRoom.com database.